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We are so excited to have Lori Jamison Rog work in our district!

Lori Jamison Rog is a teacher, author, and literacy consultant.  She has written many professional books on reading and writing instruction.  She serves as the Education Director for High Interest Publishing, which produces high interest-low vocabulary novels for struggling readers. A popular speaker at literacy conferences across North America and beyond, Lori is currently an independent consultant, providing professional development to schools and districts.

She will facilitate three 1/2 day sessions for Grades 1-3 teachers.  

Register on the staff development calendar.

Click here for more information:

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I love Donalyn Miller's books.  She also has a great blog.  Here's an article from a few years ago that's worth a re-read:

Book Challenge Revisited

Click here to read Pernille Ripp's article about kids self selecting books.

Thank you to the teachers who are participating in our "Mindset for Learning"  Book Club.  Last night was our first session.  We had great discussions, and everyone shared wonderful ideas, that inspired so many people.  This book includes a picture book list that will help you teach a growth mindset in your classroom.  Click here -  Growth Mindset Book list


The conversation has come up a lot lately about how books expose children to a lot of emotions, from fear, to jealousy, to joy, to anger.  Never has children's literature and young adult fiction been better, but it's left many of us wondering if some of our students are losing a part of their innocence through some of the books they are reading.  It has left us asking if this is okay.  Matt de la Pena wrote a beautiful article below, and Kate DiCamilo responded.  Both articles brought tears to my eyes, and I encourage you to read them both - with kleenex.

Why We Shouldn't Shield Children From Darkness

Kate DiCamillo's response

 

 

What happens when a young boy picks up a single piece of litter?  He doesn't know it, but his tiny act has big consequences.  What Matters gently explores nature’s connections, from the minuscule to the monumental, and traces the ripple effects of one child's good deed to show how we can all make a big difference

Thank you to Leah Dixon, from University Highlands, for sharing with us a great picture book to use when teaching students about effective self and peer assessment.  This book will have your class laughing, while at the same time learning about how to accept compliments as well as criticism.  

 

"Thanks for the Feedback, I Think!"  by Julia Cook