Rubber Egg Experiment from:

You will need:

  • Raw Eggs
  • Household Vinegar
  • Food Colouring (optional)
  • Jar/Vase

SET UP:

STEP 1:  Place an egg in the jar and cover with vinegar. You can color the vinegar for rainbow colored rubber eggs too!

STEP 2:  24 hours later, drain and refill with vinegar. Set aside and patiently wait 7 days. Yes! One whole week until your naked egg is ready.

Make some observations, what do you notice? Why do you think this is happening?

STEP 3:  After 7 days, remove the egg and rinse it off.

Alternatively, you can try out the eggs in vinegar after 48 hours!

 

EGG IN VINEGAR RESULTS

Now for the fun part, exploring the naked egg! A few supplies such as a magnifying glass and a large flashlight are helpful for exploration. Start with questions and using the senses to observe:

  • What does the egg feel like?
  • What color is it?
  • Is it hard or soft?
  • What does it smell like?
  • What does it look like?
  • What does it sound like when you shake it?
  • How does it compare to a regular egg?

 

CAN THE EGG BOUNCE?

TEST IT: How high can your egg bounce before it breaks? Remember, this is science….no smashing! However, this still might get messy!
Naked Egg Rubber Egg Bouncing

CAN YOU SEE THROUGH YOUR EGG?

TEST IT: Use a flashlight to help you, what can you see? What about using your flashlight in the dark to look at your egg?


WILL A RUBBER EGG BURST?

TEST IT: Place your rubber egg on a plate and prick it with a toothpick….what happened?

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN YOU PUT AN EGG IN VINEGAR?

The eggshell gets its hardness from a mineral called calcium carbonate similar to our bones.

When you place the egg into the vinegar, you will start to observe bubbles. These bubbles are a chemical reaction between the acid in the vinegar and the base in the calcium carbonate of the eggshell. When an acid and a base mix they form carbon dioxide which is a gas.

MORE EGG EXPERIMENT VARIABLES

For younger kids, this basic version is perfect! It includes the right amount of play and learning. For older kids, you might want to add some extra variables or experiments!

  • How about the egg? Are there differences in eggshells between brown and white eggs? How about organic eggs versus regular eggs?
  • What happens when you put the rubber egg back in vinegar or another liquid? How about corn syrup? Test different liquids and explore osmosis once the shell is dissolved!