Our trip to Grouse Mountain

With snowshoes in hand, we made our way to Grouse Mountain.  It was a full day, with not only snowshoeing, but also a visit to the Hiwus lodge and a look at the interdependency of the animals that live in the mountain area.  Our first activity was snowshoeing.  Some materials survived better than others.  For example, duct tape has difficulty in the snow.

A video of our snowshoes in action:  video_2017-03-10_19-34-17

After we finished snowshoeing, we visited the Hiwus longhouse where a Squamish elder shared stories and songs with us.

doing the wolf dance

Snowshoes

After researching snowshoes, deciding on an appropriate design, and brainstorming materials we could use, we were ready to begin construction.  Students experimented with a wide variety of ways to put their shoes together.

Zap straps
Hot glue
Cord

Students also created different shaped snowshoes depending on what kind of snow they thought we might encounter.  The above picture is more of an Ojibwe shape, used to break crusty snow.

Bearpaw shape used to maneuver in treed areas.
Beavertail shape is a combination of the other two styles.

 

Dave the Mind Reader

Welcome, Division Three, to our very first blog post! Today we begin our quest to become thoughtful digital citizens using our class blog. Your challenge is to think carefully and mindfully about your comment before posting it. Remember to ask yourself: how will my comment reflect who I am to the online community?

Watch the video and make a comment, using the questions below as a guideline.

  1. What most interested you in the video?
  2. How do you feel after watching it?
  3. What learning can you take from this?

Dave the Mind Reader