BLACK HISTORY MONTH

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Byrne Creek Library Books and DVDs on Black History

Black History Timelines:

Black History Online Resources:

Computer Science Education Week

This week is Computer Science Education Week (Dec 5-11)!

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Visit one of the following sites and take the Hour of Code challenge:

Code.org Program your own game with characters from Star Wars or Minecraft.
Bootstrap Program in WeScheme editor and learn about math concepts.
Kano Learn code by recreating the classic arcade game Pong.
Khan Academy Program drawings using JavaScript.
CodeCademy Animate your name, create a website or build your own galaxy.

Also, we have a number of programing books in the library; or if you prefer, come borrow a novel about hackers, virtual reality and computer games!

Nov 25: International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women

November 25 marks the beginning of 16 Days of Activism Against Gender-Based Violence. These 2 weeks starts with the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women on November 25, ends on International Human Rights Day on December 10, and includes the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women on December 6.

Come visit the library and check out a book from our display of books about girls and women who have survived violence.

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September 30th is Orange Shirt Day

Orange Shirt Day is a legacy of the St. Joseph Mission (SJM) residential school commemoration event held in Williams Lake, BC, Canada, in the spring of 2013. It grew out of Phyllis’ story of having her shiny new orange shirt taken away on her first day of school at the Mission, and it has become an opportunity to keep the discussion on all aspects of residential schools happening annually.

You can learn more about the legacy of residential schools here:

Orange Shirt Day
Legacy of Hope Foundation
Byrne Creek Library’s Books and DVDs on Residential Schools

Historica Canada’s Heritage Minute: The story of Chanie “Charlie” Wenjack, whose death sparked the first inquest into the treatment of Indigenous children in Canadian residential schools.